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Education

Post-doctoral fellow – North Carolina State University (2018-present)
Entomology and plant pathology. Project: Mechanisms of sperm viability and queen quality in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

PhD – University of British Columbia (2014-2018)
Genome sciences and technology. Thesis: Determining the molecular mechanism of hygienic behavior in honey bees (Apis mellifera)

BSc – University of British Columbia (2009-2014)
Biochemistry and molecular biology. Biology minor. Honors thesis: Effects of ocean acidification on benthic marine diatom communities.

Work Experience

Author (freelance) – American Bee Journal (Feb 2017 – present)

Teaching Assistant – UBC Department of Zoology (2015 – 2016)

Visiting Scholar – Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf, Germany (2015)

Theses and Dissertations

McAfee A. (2018). Towards defining the molecular mechanism of hygienic behaviour in honey bees (Apis mellifera). Doctoral dissertation in Genome Science and Technology at the University of British Columbia. Available online here.

McAfee A. (2013). Determination of the effects of ocean acidification on tide pool diatom community structure: An in situ analysis of bottom-up and top-down trophic interactions. BSc Honours dissertation at the University of British Columbia.

Peer Reviewed Publications

Iovinella I*, McAfee A*, Mastrobuoni G, Kempa S, Foster LJ, Pelosi P, and Dani FR. (2018). Proteomic analysis of chemosensory organs in the honey bee parasite Varroa destructor: A comprehensive examination of the potential carriers for semiochemicals. Journal of proteomics. Vol. 181, p 131-141. *Authors contributed equally.

McAfee A, Chapman A, Iovinella I, Gallagher-Kurtzke Y, Collins TF, Higo H, Madilao LL, Pelosi P, and Foster LJ. (2018). Death pheromones triggering hygienic behavior in honey bees (Apis mellifera). Scientific reports.  Vol. 8, article 5719.

McAfee A, Chan QWT, Evans J and Foster LJ. (2017). A Varroa destructor protein atlas reveals molecular underpinnings of developmental transitions and sexual differentiation. Molecular and Cellular Proteomics. Vol. 16, Issue 12, p 2125–2137. doi: 10.1074/mcp.RA117.000104.

McAfee A, Collins TF, Madilao LL and Foster LJ. (2017). Odorant cues linked to social immunity induce lateralized antenna stimulation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). Scientific Reports. Vol. 7, article 46171.

McAfee A and Foster LJ. (2017). Proteogenomics: Recycling public data to improve genome annotations. In: Arun K. Shukla, Editors, Methods in Enzymology, Academic Press, Vol. 585, p 217-243.

Trapp J*, McAfee A* and Foster LJ. (2017). Genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics: Enabling insights into social evolution and disease challenges for managed and wild bees. Molecular Ecology, Vol. 26, Issue 3, p 718-739. *Authors contributed equally.

McAfee A, Harpur BA, Michaud S, Beavis R, Zayed A. and Foster LJ. (2016). Towards an upgraded honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) genome annotation using proteogenomics. Journal of Proteome Research. Vol. 15, Issue 2, p 411–421.

McAfee A, Michaud S. and Foster LJ. (2015). Controlled, cross-species dataset for exploring biases in genome annotation and modification profiles. Data in Brief. Vol. 5, p 829 – 833.

Non-peer Reviewed Publications

McAfee A. (2019). Mycelium medicine. American bee journal. In press.

McAfee A. (2019). You are what your mom ate. American bee journal. Vol 159, Issue 2.

McAfee A. (2019). The trouble with headlines. American bee journal. Vol 159, Issue 1.

McAfee A. (2018). Brood matters too: The role of brood in social immunity. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 12.

McAfee A. (2018). Precision Pollination. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 11.

McAfee A. (2018). The surprising benefit of laying workers. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 10.

McAfee A. (2018). Life without fumagillin. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 9.

McAfee A. (2018). Long live the sperm. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 8.

McAfee A. (2018). The blueberries and the bees. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 7.

McAfee A. (2018). Unlocking a troublesome genome. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 6.

McAfee A. (2018). Who’s got the guts? American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 4.

McAfee A. (2018). What happened to the genetically engineered honey bee? American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 3.

McAfee A. (2018). Hygienic behaviour and the scent of death. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 2.

McAfee A. (2018). How a Nobel Prize in physiology is influencing tomorrow’s varroa control. American bee journal. Vol 158, Issue 1.

McAfee A. (2017). Hive of science for bees: Report from an international pollinator workshop. American bee journal. Vol 157, Issue 12.

Egea E, Sanchez W, Garrigues P, Bayeta GA, Arce A, Beaurepaire A, Boily M, Bonmatin J-M, Bouga M, Branchiccela MB, Garrido PM, Maderson S, McAfee A, de Mattos IM, Ming-Xian Y, Moritz R, Neumann P, Proffit M, Schatz B, Stoic M, and Younger PM. The Rovaltain Foundation engages in pollinator health. Bee World. 95(1): 20-21.

McAfee A. (2017). Transgenic honey bees: Should they take wing in the field, or stay in the lab? UBC INK journal. Vol. 4, Issue 1.

McAfee A. (2017). Breeding a better bee: Three social immunity traits, one massive experiment. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 11.

McAfee A. (2017). Hives for Humanity: Using bees to create social change in the Downtown Eastside. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 10.

Bixby M and McAfee A. (2017). Growing Canada’s queen breeding industry: Results from the 2016 – 2017 queen breeder survey. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 8.

McAfee A. (2017). Going Molecular: Insights into the life of a Varroa mite. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 8.

McAfee A. (2017). A brief history of pesticides. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 7.

McAfee A. (2017). The diversity dispute. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 6.

McAfee A. (2017). Points of debate: Exploring pollinator misconceptions. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 5.

McAfee A. (2017). Mechanisms of hygienic behavior: It’s all about the necromones. American bee journal. Vol. 157, Issue 4.

McAfee A. (2018). Reflections on Bee Master 2018. Bee Scene. Vol 34, Issue 1.

McAfee A. (2018). BCHPA strikes a research committee to look at colony health and blueberry pollination. Bee Scene. Vol 33, Issue 4.

McAfee A. (2018). Finally, marker-assisted selection for honey bees! Bee Scene. Vol 33, Issue 3.

McAfee A. (2017). Neonics: The answered and unanswered questions. Bee Scene. Vol. 33, Issue 2.

McAfee A. (2017). More than pesticides. Bee Scene. Vol. 33, Issue 1.

McAfee A. (2017). Is low genetic diversity really a problem? Bee Scene. Vol. 32, Issue 4.

McAfee A. (2017). Bee research in the ‘omics era: Unlocking a troublesome genome. Center for Blood Research Blog. http://cbr.ubc.ca/8738-2/

McAfee A. (2016). What’s so great about the Asian honey bee? Bee Scene. Vol 32, Issue 3.

McAfee A. (2016). The buzz about Bombus. Bee Scene. Vol. 32, Issue 2.

McAfee A. (2016). Which virus is the worst? Bee Scene. Vol. 32, Issue 1.

Awards and Distinctions

  • NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship (2020-2022)
  • American Association of Professional Apiculturists Student Award (2018)
  • International Union for the Study of Social Insects Travel Award (2018)
  • Avtar S. Atwal Scholarship in Pollinator Research (2018)
  • UBC Four Year Fellowship (2015-2019)
  • Canadian Association of Professional Apiculturists Student Merit Award (2017)
  • NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship – Doctoral (2015-2018)
  • Australasian Proteomics Society Travel Award (2016)
  • BC Proteomics Network Travel Award (2015)
  • NSERC Canada Graduate Scholarship – Masters (2014)
  • Michael Smith Foreign Studies Supplement (2014)
  • Sayward Community Bursary (2009-2014)
  • Walmart Canada Community Scholarship (2009-2013)
  • Genome Sciences and Technology Undergraduate Student Research Award (2013)
  • NSERC Undergraduate Student Research Award (2013)
  • Biodiversity Research Training and Education Undergraduate Student Research Award (2012)
  • Jamie Smith Field Course Award (2012)
  • UBC Trek Excellence Award (2009)
  • UBC President’s Entrance Scholarship (2009)
  • Graduate Program Examinations Scholarship (2009)

Conference Presentations

The scent of death: Odorants triggering hygienic behaviour in honey bees (Apis mellifera). (2018). Entomological Society of America. Vancouver, Canada. International conference. 10 min oral presentation.

Death pheromones triggering hygienic behaviour in honey bees (Apis mellifera). (2018). International Union for the Study of Social Insects. Guaruja, Brazil. International conference. 15 min oral presentation.

A Varroa destructor protein atlas reveals molecular underpinnings of sexual regulation and developmental transitions. (2017). Entomological society of America. Denver, USA. International conference. 15 min oral presentation.

Mechanisms of hygienic behaviour: It’s all about the necromones. (2017). Canadian Association of Professional Apiculturists. Kelowna, Canada. National conference. 15 min oral presentation.

Improving honey bee health through social immunity. (2017). Hive of science for bees. Alixan, France. International workshop. 20 minute oral presentation.

Proteome profiling of persistant honey bee primary cells. (2016). Lorne proteomics symposium. Lorne, Australia. International conference. 15 min oral presentation.

A smarter way to breed healthy bees. (2016). Agriculture biotechnology science communciations. Saskatoon, Canada. International conference. 15 min oral presentation.

Proteogenomics: Towards an upgraded honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) genome annotation. (2015). Human proteomics organization. Vancouver, Canada. International conference. 15 min min oral presentation.

Outreach Presentations

Honey bee necromones: Finding the brood cues that stimulate hygienic behaviour. (2018). Trifecta Beekeeping Event. 45 min presentation. Hood River, Oregon, USA.

Why are scientists making transgenic honey bees? (2018). Trifecta Beekeeping Event. 45 min presentation. Hood River, Oregon, USA.

How to perform hygienic testing on your colonies. (2018). Trifecta Beekeeping Event. 45 min in-hive demonstration. Hood River, Oregon, USA.

Honey bee necromones: Finding the brood cues that stimulate hygienic behaviour. (2018). Richmond Bee Club. 30 min presentation. Richmond, Canada.

Hygienic behaviour and genetic engineering. (2018). Bee Masters Course. 50 min presentation. Vancouver, Canada.

Improving honey bee health through social immunity. (2017). Langley Beekeepers Club. 30 min presentation. Langley, Canada.

A smarter way to breed healthy bees. (2017). Cowichan Beekeepers Club. 30 min presentation. Cowichan Valley, Canada.

Honey bee genetic engineering. (2016). Bee Masters Course. 45 min presentation. Vancouver, Canada.

Volunteering

  • Bee Masters Course Co-organizer (2018)
  • Contributing author – Bee Scene (2016 – present)
  • Michael Smith Laboratories First-aid attendant (2015-present)
  • Department representative on the Graduate Student Society Council (2014-2015)
  • Graduate Student Society Human Resources Committee (2014-2015)
  • Field Research Assistant at Mpala Research Center, Kenya (Jan 2014 – Mar 2014)

Workshops

  • Hive of Science for Bees (Oct 9th – 13th 2017). Rovaltain Foundation. Alixan, France.
  • Beakerhead Science Communication: Focus on Science Storytelling (May 31st – June 3rd 2017). Jay Ingram, Mary Anne Moser, Niki Wilson and Thomas Hayden. Squamish, Canada.
  • Getting noticed: Communication skills for academic researchers (Apr 5th 2017). Simon Clews. Vancouver, Canada.
  • Visual Design Principles for Scientific Data (Mar 7th 2016). Dr. Martin Krzywinski. Vancouver, Canada.
  • Media-wise Relations (Mar. 5th 2016). Carol Boothroyd, CBC reporter. Vancouver, Canada.
  • MaxQuant Summer School (June 29 – July 3, 2015). Dr. Juergen Cox and Dr. Matthias Mann. Martinsried, Germany.
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